New Report: ESPN IS BLEEDING SUBSCRIBERS LIKE A LEAKY FAUCET

Like most folks, I am a sports fan and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that as any other decent person can tell you.

That being said, you can’t watch every single game that you want to watch because there just isn’t enough time in the day to do something like that.

Which is why networks like ESPN used to be great because they would give you the Reader’s Digest version of everything that was going on in sports.

However, in recent years they have decided to turn as many things as they can into a political talk show format where they riff on politics as much as they do professional baseball. People hate that. Politics is serious business and sometimes you do need an escape from that serious business. That’s why I personally hate it when the two mix together because I am watching the game to enjoy myself.

ESPN doesn’t recognize the fact that I am not the only one that thinks like this and has insisted on trudging ahead with this idea of mixing sports with politics. Little do they know that despite various extremely vocal warnings that people don’t want that crap, they are going to find out how hard the blowback to something like this can be.

According to Disney’s recently released annual report, sports network ESPN has lost 2 million domestic subscribers over the course of 2018.

Disney’s report revealed that the company’s sports network, ESPN, currently has 86 million subscribers. This is down two million from the 88 million subscribers to the sports commentary and news station in 2017.

ESPN wasn’t the only Disney-owned network to lose subscribers this year: The Disney Channel went from 92 million subscribers in 2017 to 89 million subscribers in 2018, while Freeform fell by two million subscribers to 90 million, and Disney Junior and Disney XD both lost approximately three million subscribers.

The network’s declining subscriber counts, based on estimates by Nielsen Media Research, indicate that the growing popularity of online streaming services and internet live streaming products such as YouTube Live and Hulu have resulted in a decline in traditional television network subscriptions.

Disney is attempting to alleviate this issue with the launch of their own online streaming service, Disney Plus, expected to be launched in 2019.

Disney launched ESPN Plus, an online sports streaming service, in early 2018 and claims that the service has received approximately one million subscribers so far.

However, it appears that their traditional television network subscriber numbers are continuing to decline.

ESPN has come under fire this year for the inclusion of political elements within their coverage and has been accused of a left-leaning bias. Breitbart News reporter Warner Todd Huston reported in Februray 2017 that the network was losing subscribers at a rapid pace as a result of the network’s political move, according to the latest fiscal report, Huston was correct.

Huston stated in his article: Fox Sports Radio host Clay Travis recently slammed ESPN as the “social justice warrior network” saying, “ESPN decided to become a social justice warrior network, treating all liberal opinion makers as those worthy of promotion and casting aside all those who had the gall to challenge the new Disney world order … I’m not saying that ESPN should just stick to sports, but I am saying that if you decide to allow political opinions to flourish from your network’s stars that you shouldn’t neuter all conservative opinion and allow liberal political opinion to advance unchecked. … Those with liberal opinions are rewarded and allowed to speak freely, those with conservative opinions are told to keep their mouths shut.”

Indeed, even ESPN itself seemed to walk up right to the edge of admitting it has gone too far to the political left with a piece by the network’s ombudsman exploring the problem. A long piece back in November by ESPN ombudsman Jim Brady presents evidence that complaints have resonated, even inside its executive boardroom, that they have become far too liberal.

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